RGB BOOK
BOOK DESIGN — SPRING 2014

The following book is a compilation of three essays, preceded with a piece of writing of my own. The essays include the following: Fluid Typography by Ellen Lupton, Dematerialization of Screen Space by Jessica Helfand, and Import/Export by Lev Manovich.

In her 2000 dissertation Fluid Typography, Ellen Lupton discusses the malleability of visual language, and how it has changed over time. She recalls that Renaissance letterforms once reflected the curving lines of handwriting. Today, this fluidity has transferred from the letterforms to the lines of text. Like a liquid, text conforms to the shape of its container. We are no longer restricted by the "rigid architecture" of the page.

In Jessica Helfand's Dematerialization of Screen Space, 2001, she addresses the fact that the computer is our connection to the world. Although it is a small workspace, it allows for an infinite audience. It allows for "portable media, transient journeys, and movable boundaries." It is up to us as designers to stake claim to this new universe.

Lev Manovich's Import / Export, 2006, expands upon this idea. He argues that compatibility between various computer software and file formats has allowed a hybridity of modern visual aesthetics. Elements in one program may be imported into another program, and elements created in yet another program, may be incorporated as well.

The flow of language across multiple channels has elicited greater connectivity across countries, systems, and organizations. Using an RGB screen-space color scheme, "Adobe CS language," and imagery from the computer, the printed book, and other methods of communication, this publication celebrates the notion of "soft copy" and the journey of the written word across ever-expanding new media.


The following is an animation of the entire book.

This publication was designed, printed, and bound by Dana Famiglietti at the Rhode Island School of Design, for Anther Kiley's Typography III class, in May 2014.

Typeset in Maison Neue and Maison Mono, designed by Milieu Grotesque, a Berlin- Zurich-based, independent publisher and distributor of typefaces.

This edition was printed on Neenah Classic Crest Antique Gray Paper, and Neenah Translucent White.

Images were derived from John Maeda's 2001 publication, Post Digital.